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My favorite definition for bisexuality so far is the one popularized by (the wonderful) bisexual activist Robyn Ochs. Ochs says, “I call myself bisexual because I acknowledge that I have in myself the potential to be attracted—romantically and/or sexually—to people of more than one sex, and/or gender, not necessarily at the same time, not necessarily in the same way, and not necessarily to the same degree.”

This is by far the broadest and most enabling definition of bisexuality that I’ve found to date. Its strength is in the way it enables anyone who wants to identify as bisexual to do so. (In other words, it reassures people.) In a world in which bisexuality is usually very narrowly defined, many people who experience bisexual desire, and want to identify as bi, often feel afraid to start (or keep) identifying as such, as they feel as though they “don’t qualify.” The role that an enabling definition for bisexuality can fulfill to counter these feelings of internalized biphobia is invaluable—and I feel that Ochs’s definition does just that. It reassures people that they are “allowed” to identify as bisexual if they wish to do so.

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Shiri Eisner, Bi: Notes for a Bisexual Revolution (p. 21-22)

So the bisexual community has similar issues to the asexual community. An interesting parallel.

(via yourfictionmyreality)

(Source: bisexualmind, via hella-androgynous)

startingwithayang:

The year is 2214

A person is walking through a mueseum and sees a CD

"I remember that band, my great-grandma used to love them." Says the person

Drum beats fill the air as Fall Out Boy comes down from the heavens

They did it

They were remembered for centuries

(via postcardsfromformerselves)

me on my way home from class: oh man i'm gonna get so much work done let me make a to do list and get that shit done quickly and effectively i'm so pumped

me the second i get home: nah